SERVING THOSE WHO SERVE US DAILY…

Every day there is a house fire where the occupants are severely injured or killed. Every day there is a high-speed chase where lives are at stake. Every day there is a moment where a police officer is forced to choose between their life and the life of another human being. Every day there is a team of people rushing to save the life of a child, a mother, a father, a husband, a wife. Every day since the end of 2001 a unit has been engaged in combat operations somewhere in the world. Every moment of every day is unscheduled, unknown and uncertain, and, uncertain as to how far someone will have to go to protect lives, property or the security of our Nation.

OUR VISION is to empower those who serve us to face the challenges of their respective roles by providing them the most relevant training, development and tools critical and necessary to success on the job AND AT HOME.

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THE EVIDENCE IS REAL

For the third straight year, more officers died by suicide than in the line of duty. According to Blue H.E.L.P., a nonprofit run by active and retired police officers, at least 159 officers took their own lives in 2018, the same number of suicides tracked in 2017 and 19 more than in 2016.

Less than 10 percent of U.S. departments have suicide prevention programs. 

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IT’S TIME TO ACT

Exposure to trauma, horrific accidents and shootings are leading to mental health struggles that often get untreated. The rate of PTSD and depression for police and firefighters is five times higher than the civilian population.

USA Today reported that 103 firefighters and 140 police officers died by suicide in 2017, compared to 93 firefighter and 129 officer line-of-duty deaths.

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AFTER THE FACT DOESN’T CUT IT

The U.S. military finished 2018 with a troubling, sad statistic: It experienced the highest number of suicides among active-duty personnel in at least six years.

A total of 321 active-duty members took their lives during the year, including 57 Marines, 68 sailors, 58 airmen, and 138 soldiers.

The deaths equal the total number of active-duty personnel who died by suicide in 2012, the record since the services began closely tracking the issue in 2001.

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SHORT ON TIME, MONEY, RESOURCES

Critics believe the lack of resources for mental health adds to lives being lost. Mental health experts say the barrier that keeps officers from seeking help are shame, fear of being off the job and the stigma behind it.

With all of this being the reality faced by our firefighters, emergency services personnel, law enforcement officers and military, NO ONE is formally teaching them how to step into these situations, how to mentally, physically and emotionally prepare themselves for the challenges ahead, AND giving them the tools to return home undamaged.